Posts Tagged ‘Filipino bread’

PHILIPPINE BREAD 

A traditional Filipino breakfast is someone’s version of lunch or dinner: sinangag (garlic fried rice), tocino (Philippine version of the Spanish bacon) or corned beef, and fried egg (usually sunny side up) washed down with black coffee. This is too heavy for me so I opt for two pieces of pan de sal slathered with jam, cream cheese, peanut butter, or butter. Pan de sal is part of any Filipino’s breakfast or merienda (roughly translated as snack) if you’re going for a lighter fare. Unfortunately, it is difficult looking for pan de sal outside of the Philippines unless you’re somewhere in the US where Filipino bakeries and convenience stores are ubiquitous.

pan de sal by Kamuning Bakery


In the Philippines, pan de sal is now usually sold in major bakeries in the malls and supermarkets in the cities which means that they are not the usual piping hot, fresh-from-the-oven bread that is less on sweetness which is normally expected of Filipino bread. As its name would have it – pan de sal translates to salt bread – it’s leaning on the salty side, but not enough to give you blood pressure problems. However, French Baker, a bakery cum cafe located in most SM malls, has bucked the trend and has been selling huge, fresh-from-the-oven cracked pan de sal (it cracks when you pinch it).

Outside of the malls and within residential areas, Kamuning Bakery in Quezon City is still the to-go to place for freshly baked pan de sal which is available early in the morning. This small mom-and-pop store, which opened its doors in 1939 on the corner of K-1st and Judge Jimenez streets, is still standing but has since gone through major upgrades and expansion. For one thing, they now have an outlet at SM North Edsa, one of the major malls under the SM group. Another noted difference is the absence of the homey, neighborhood store vibe which has been replaced by a more formal bakery ambience complete with a glass display of refrigerated cakes and drinks, and several racks filled with an array of wrapped breads. 

The sale of pan de sal is an open secret.There is no sign advertising its sale. One simply goes up to the counter and places an order with the crew (sadly, a grumpy one) who then asks monotonously how many pieces you want and proceeds to pick up the pan de sal with tongs and drop them in a paper bag. The carb-conscious eater shuns the regular pan de sal because it primarily uses white flour, but Kamuning Bakery has got its ear on the ground about healthy eating and has come with wheat pan de sal. Regrettably, it wasn’t available that day. 

pan de suelo by Kamuning Bakery


Looking around the bakery, I spotted what I thought was a bag of wheat pan de sal. I was mistaken and was immediately corrected by grumpy chops who said it was pan de suelo. Pan de suelo is, as my research yielded, a precursor of pan de sal. Made from wheat flour, its consistency resembles a bagel or a softer French baguette. My Spanish should have kicked in after hearing the name: pan de suelo translates to “floor bread” thus one gets an inkling of its texture. Not a fan of the French baguette, the pan de suelo, I discovered, was a good alternative to the pan de sal. A few minutes in the toaster oven and you have a softer pan de suelo ready to be smothered with one’s spread of choice. This time I went for pineapple jam from The Fruit Garden.

The pan de sal and pan de suelo are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the pantheon of tinapay (Filipino for bread which is pronounced as tee-na-pie). Word of caution: you need to love carbs to discover them.

What is for breakfast- pan de suelo (back) or pan de sal?

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